Art from the Heart – true story

Our little art studio not only does classes for kids and adults here, but we also travel to offsite events quite often. We began teaching at a second nursing home just a few months ago. This particular senior home caters to residents with memory problems, dementia and Alzheimers disease. I get so wrapped up in planning the class, prepping for everything and implementing the curriculum that sometimes we lose sight of the people. Oh, the residents are so receptive and ready to begin. Our last session caught us off-guard when we arrived 40 minutes early to prep and all the residents were already at the tables ready to start their art projects!SOLANA CUSTOMER

Art is so transcendental. We have encountered people who have deteriorated motor skills or communication skills. People who were art professors, business owners, geologists and more. But when we place the canvas, paints and brushes in full view, the eagerness in their eyes is overwhelming. I appreciate the nurses and caregivers who assist us at the homes while painting but I remind them that when the resident goes “off” into their own idea of art, that this is a good thing. There is no “right” or “wrong” in art.

At our May class, we had a wonderfully receptive group of about 10 residents who painted a beach scene of dunes. The director loved the small canvases and placed them on display around the memory-care home. When we arrived again in June, she took me aside and privately told me the most touching story.

During our last May session, one of the residents (who was about to turn 99) had decided to participate in the painting class. The director was surprised because she said this same resident in all her years at the home would never participate in any of the cooking classes, floral classes or social events that they held regularly. But, for some reason, she wanted to paint that day. I was shown a collage of the residents who were photographed painting that day. She pointed to the bright-eyed woman in the center of the collage and said, “She painted that day and passed away peacefully the next week. When her family came to take her belongings, they found the small little painting their mother had just painted the week before. To know that to the very end, she lived life happily brought the family to tears.” That little beach scene meant so much to her adult children; they cherished her art because it brought them comfort.

The director seemed to want to thank me but I felt as if I was the one who was privileged to have been given the opportunity to share this gift with her group. Thank you God for allowing me to share your gift with those who sometimes need it more that I do. Thank you for reminding me that art does come from the heart.

 

One comment on Art from the Heart – true story

  1. Diana says:

    What a beautiful story…yea ART!!

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Art from the Heart – true story

Our little art studio not only does classes for kids and adults here, but we also travel to offsite events quite often. We began teaching at a second nursing home just a few months ago. This particular senior home caters to residents with memory problems, dementia and Alzheimers disease. I get so wrapped up in planning the class, prepping for everything and implementing the curriculum that sometimes we lose sight of the people. Oh, the residents are so receptive and ready to begin. Our last session caught us off-guard when we arrived 40 minutes early to prep and all the residents were already at the tables ready to start their art projects!SOLANA CUSTOMER

Art is so transcendental. We have encountered people who have deteriorated motor skills or communication skills. People who were art professors, business owners, geologists and more. But when we place the canvas, paints and brushes in full view, the eagerness in their eyes is overwhelming. I appreciate the nurses and caregivers who assist us at the homes while painting but I remind them that when the resident goes “off” into their own idea of art, that this is a good thing. There is no “right” or “wrong” in art.

At our May class, we had a wonderfully receptive group of about 10 residents who painted a beach scene of dunes. The director loved the small canvases and placed them on display around the memory-care home. When we arrived again in June, she took me aside and privately told me the most touching story.

During our last May session, one of the residents (who was about to turn 99) had decided to participate in the painting class. The director was surprised because she said this same resident in all her years at the home would never participate in any of the cooking classes, floral classes or social events that they held regularly. But, for some reason, she wanted to paint that day. I was shown a collage of the residents who were photographed painting that day. She pointed to the bright-eyed woman in the center of the collage and said, “She painted that day and passed away peacefully the next week. When her family came to take her belongings, they found the small little painting their mother had just painted the week before. To know that to the very end, she lived life happily brought the family to tears.” That little beach scene meant so much to her adult children; they cherished her art because it brought them comfort.

The director seemed to want to thank me but I felt as if I was the one who was privileged to have been given the opportunity to share this gift with her group. Thank you God for allowing me to share your gift with those who sometimes need it more that I do. Thank you for reminding me that art does come from the heart.

 

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